Virtual Exhibits

The High Point Museum’s Virtual Exhibits illustrate the many stories of High Point and unique objects in our collection. Current exhibits feature local sports, City Lake Park, High Point Normal & Industrial Institute, and many other topics. New exhibits are frequently added and can be found here.
  • 52 Weeks of Community Memories - Part 1
    In celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the High Point Historical Society, The High Point Enterprise published one photograph from the collection each week during 2016.
  • 52 Weeks of Community Memories - Part 2
  • 52 Weeks of Community Memories - Part 3
  • 52 Weeks of Community Memories - Part 4
  • A Pathway to Opportunity
    During the era of segregation, the High Point Normal and Industrial Institute opened the doors of education to generations of High Point's African-American citizens.
  • Centenary of the War to End All Wars
    This virtual exhibit presents photographs from the High Point Historical Society's collection of men and women who served. 
  • Founders' Faces
    During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, it was fashionable for important people to have their portraits painted. Because of the support these people gave to the life of the city, their faces have become part of the fabric of High Point's history.
  • From High Point to Derby Downs
    Although many of today's youth only know of the event through movies such as The Little Rascals, Soap Box Derby racing was wildly popular during the Mid-20th Century.
  • Furniture City Feasts
    The 2013 North Carolina Archives Week theme "Homegrown!" spotlights photographs and other archival materials containing our state's rich food culture and history.
  • High Point at Play 
    Each October, North Carolina celebrates Archives Month. The 2016 theme was, North Carolina at Play: Health and Leisure in Our State.
  • High Point City Lake Park
    High Point's City Lake was created in the late 1920s with the construction of a dam across the Deep River. During the Great Depression of the 1930s, the federal Civil Works Administration gave $125,000 to build the surrounding park.
  • High Point Furniture Market
    Grown from modest beginnings, what High Pointers call "Market" is now recognized as the world's foremost exhibition of home furnishings.
  • High Point Postcards 
    Ideal for showing High Point's progressive and modern downtown, picture postcards were bought and mailed by residents and visitors alike.
  • Make Every Week Fire Prevention Week 
    President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed Fire Prevention Week in 1925 to remember the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 and over 250 people who died in it.
  • Melzetta Williams: A Teacher's Recollections
    Enjoy five pages of a scrapbook created by High Point native Melzetta Fowler Adams Williams in the 1930s.
  • Merry Christmas, High Point!
    Enjoy a selection of nostalgic Christmas cards & postcards donated to the High Point Museum.
  • North Main Street 
    North Main Street was High Point's commercial district for more than half a century.
  • Out of the Woodwork
    In the fall of 2013, High Point University's "Documenting the Community Through Photography" class chose to go behind the scenes in High Point's furniture factories and at the High Point Market to discover what it takes to bring high-quality furniture and accessories to retail stores around the world.
  • Play Ball!
    Baseball was very popular in High Point during the decades before World War II.
  • South Main Street 
    South Main Street's development through the 1950s.
  • Stitches in Time The theme of the 2015 North Carolina Archives Month, North Carolina Arts, Crafts, and Music Traditions, reflects upon our state's traditional folkways.
  • The Hub of High Point
    The crossroads community which grew around the intersection of the plank road connecting Fayetteville to Salem and a new railroad connecting Goldsboro to Charlotte became the hub of inns and general stores catering to the passing stage and rail traffic.
  • The Spirit of Enterprise
    High Point's fortunate location at the crossroads of North Carolina's transportation networks contributed to its rapid growth and economic success.